Now that we know the UK produces wine, let’s take a look at what they have to offer in terms of grape varieties.

 

White grape varieties

The following white grape varieties are grown in the UK – most of them ripen early and grow well in cooler climates:

  • Auxerrois: low acidity, nice as a sparkling wine base, also grown in Alsace, Luxembourg, Burgundy, USA, Canada and New Zealand.
  • Bacchus: one of UK’s top varieties, it’s a crossing of (Silvaner x Riesling) with Müller-Thurgau; with high sugar content and also grown in Germany.
  • Chardonnay: one of the top grape varieties on the production of sparkling wines.
  • Faberrebe: it’s a crossing of Pinot Blanc with Müller-Thurgau, also grown in Germany.
  • Huxelrebe: it’s a crossing of Chasselas with Courtillier Musqué, suitable for dessert wines and also grown in Germany. It’s a high-yielding grape that ripens early. Now what’s up with all this “-rebe”, you mean? It’s the German suffix for “vine”.
  • Kerner: it’s a crossing of Trollinger with Riesling, also grown in Germany, Switzerland, Austria and Italy (and by the way, Trollinger is known as Schiava Grossa or Vernatsch in Italy).
  • Madeleine Angevine: low on acidity, used in blends, it grows well in cooler climates.
  • Müller-Thurgau
  • Optima: it’s a crossing of (Silvaner x Riesling) with Müller-Thurgau, also grown in Germany, suitable for dessert wines.
  • Orion: it’s a crossing of Optima with Villard Blanc, also grown in Germany.
  • Ortega: it’s a crossing of Müller-Thurgau with Siegerrebe, suitable for dessert wines, also grown in Germany.
  • Phoenix: it’s a crossing of Bacchus with Villard Blanc, also grown in Germany, disease resistant, but not widely planted.
  • Pinot Blanc
  • Pinot Gris: also known as Grauburgunder, Pinot Grigio, Malvoisie and Ruländer, among others.
  • Regner: it’s a crossing of Luglienca Bianca (a.k.a. Seidentraube) with Gamay, low on acidity with good sugar content.
  • Reichensteiner: it’s a crossing of Müller-Thurgau with (Madeleine Angevine x Calabreser Fröhlich), one of the most widely grown grapes in UK, also grown in Germany and New Zealand.
  • Rivaner: a synonym for Müller-Thurgau.
  • Schönburger: it’s a crossing of Pinot Noir with (Chasselas x Muscat Hamburg) and gets along really well with the British weather.
  • Seyval Blanc: one of the most widely grown grapes in UK, it’s disease resistant and suitable for oak aging, also grown in Canada and the USA.
  • Siegerrebe: also grown in Germany and the USA.
  • Würzer: it’s a crossing of Gewürztraminer with Müller-Thurgau and not widely grown.

 

Red grape varieties

The following red grape varieties are grown in the UK:

  • Dornfelder: it’s a crossing of Helfensteiner with Heroldrebe, shows a deep colour and is also grown in Germany.
  • Dunkelfelder: it shows a deep colour, low acidity and is also grown in Germany.
  • Pinot Meunier: one of the top grape varieties on the production of sparkling wines, it’s rather known as Wrotham Pinot in the UK.
  • Pinot Noir: originally from Burgundy, it’s one of the top grape varieties on the production of sparkling wines.
  • Regent: it’s a crossing of (Silvaner x Müller-Thurgau) with Chambourcin, it’s also grown in Germany and Belgium.
  • Rondo: it’s a crossing of Saperavi Servernyi with St. Laurent and is also grown in Denmark, Ireland, Sweden and the Netherlands.
  • Triomphe: sometimes named Triomphe d’Alsace, it’s also grown in France and Germany.

Now what do Brits do with these grapes? British wines or English wines? Do you know the difference?

Please note that the image seen on top does not belong to Banana In My Wine. It belongs to “Pixabay”.